The 9 Best Known and Most Important Medicinal Mushrooms.

Updated: Feb 3

What are the most medicinal mushrooms? Overview of the medicinal mushrooms. What are they called? What do they look? And what effects can they have?


1. Reishi / Ling Zhi / Shiny Lackporling (Ganoderma lucidum)


Reishi is celebrated as the “Mushroom of Longevity” and “Mushroom of the Centennial”. It counteracts age-related diseases and inflammation of all kinds and has a positive effect on the immune system:

  • strong antioxidant (combats oxidative stress)

  • protects nerve cells and stimulates neurite growth

  • lowers blood sugar

  • lowers high cholesterol levels

  • has a positive effect on chronic inflammation in the body

  • reduces chronic stress on the adrenal gland

  • supports liver detoxification

  • has a calming effect

  • has potentially good effects together with Cordyceps and Lion's Mane (Hericium)

Sources: [1-2]

  1. Liang-Wei Chen; Yan-Qin Wang; Li-Chun Wei; Mei Shi and Ying-Shing Chan (2007): Chinese Herbs and Herbal Extracts for Neuroprotection of Dopaminergic Neurons and Potential Therapeutic Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. In: CNS & Neurological Disorders – Drug Targets 6 (4), S. 273–281. DOI: 10.2174/187152707781387288.

  2. Zhang, Ruiping; Xu, Shengli; Cai, Yanning; Zhou, Ming; Zuo, Xiaohong; Chan, Piu (2011): Ganoderma lucidum Protects Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration through Inhibition of Microglial Activation. In: Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM 2011, S. 156810. DOI: 10.1093/ecam/nep075.


2. Chaga / Schillerporling (Inonotus obliquus)


Chaga is the Russian counterpart to Reishi - a Russian “anti-aging agent” and has proven itself in relation to cancer:

  • widely used in Russian folk medicine as an anti-cancer agent

  • reduces chronic inflammation (cause of many metabolic diseases)

  • helps with pancreatitis

  • calms the intestinal flora

  • prevents weight gain and fatty liver in mouse studies

  • very powerful antioxidant

  • improves your well-being

  • has a stimulating effect (I really like to drink chaga tea which tastes like black tea)

Studies [1-4]

  1. Hu, Yang; Teng, Chunying; Yu, Sumei; Wang, Xin; Liang, Jinsong; Bai, Xin et al. (2017): Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide regulates gut microbiota of chronic pancreatitis in mice. In: AMB Express 7 (1), S. 39. DOI: 10.1186/s13568-017-0341-1.

  2. Kang, Ju-Hee; Jang, Jeong-Eun; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Lee, Hee-Ju; Nho, Chu Won; Shin, Dongyun et al. (2015): Ergosterol peroxide from Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) exhibits anti-cancer activity by down-regulation of the beta-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer. In: Journal of ethnopharmacology 173, S. 303–312. DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2015.07.030.

  3. Mu, Haibo; Zhang, Amin; Zhang, Wuxia; Cui, Guoting; Wang, Shunchun; Duan, Jinyou (2012): Antioxidative properties of crude polysaccharides from Inonotus obliquus. In: International journal of molecular sciences 13 (7), S. 9194–9206. DOI: 10.3390/ijms13079194.

  4. Zhang, Ruiping; Xu, Shengli; Cai, Yanning; Zhou, Ming; Zuo, Xiaohong; Chan, Piu (2011): Ganoderma lucidum Protects Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration through Inhibition of Microglial Activation. In: Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM 2011, S. 156810. DOI: 10.1093/ecam/nep075.


3. Caterpillar Fungus (Cordyceps Sinensis)


In nature, Cordyceps - also known as caterpillar fungus - is a fungus that affects caterpillar larvae. It eats its way through the caterpillar and ultimately spreads through spore formation.


Cordyceps, which is grown for food, is not grown in caterpillars but in bioreactors. That makes things a lot more palatable.


Cordyceps is also accepted as a means of payment in Tibet where it is as valuable as gold.


The caterpillar mushroom is known as the “mushroom for more energy” as it supports energy production as well as the thyroid and adrenal glands. Furthermore, this mushroom:

  • helps against night sweats

  • lowers high blood sugar

  • reduces bad cholesterol (LDL), increases good cholesterol (HDL)

  • lowers high blood lipid levels

  • is helpful for respiratory diseases such as asthma

  • helps with kidney problems

  • improves heart rhythm problems

  • prevents blood clots

  • has a positive effect on the liver and against hepatitis

  • isantibacterial

  • lowers inflammation in the body

  • increases libido (see increasing testosterone)

  • increases blood circulation in the body

  • improves cognitive abilities (nootropics)

  • is good for chronic exhaustion and chronic fatigue

  • promotes libido and increases testosterone levels

Studies [1-2]

  1. Cha, Jae-Young; Ahn, Hee-Young; Cho, Young-Su; Je, Jae-Young (2013): Protective effect of cordycepin-enriched Cordyceps militaris on alcoholic hepatotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats. In: Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 60, S. 52–57. DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2013.07.033.

  2. Lei, Jiaji; Wei, Youlei; Song, Pengcheng; Li, Yongchao; Zhang, Tianze; Feng, Qingjiang; Xu, Guangquan (2017): Cordycepin inhibits LPS-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting inflammation and oxidative stress. In: European journal of pharmacology 818, S. 110–114. DOI: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2017.10.029.


4. Lion's Mane / Hedgehog Goatee (Hericium erinaceus)


The Hericium is a very interesting-looking mushroom: It actually looks like a lion's mane and is the secret star among the medicinal mushrooms, as it:


helps against stomach ulcers / gastritis and dementias

  • in mouse studies has proven helpful against depression and anxiety amd may also be used in humans in the future

  • helps with liver damage caused by alcohol

  • protects the stomach lining from stomach acid or pathogens

  • reduces systemic inflammation in the body and also prevents chronic diseases

  • improves communication between immune cells in the intestine and can strengthen the immune system so that it reacts more flexibly to pathogens

  • increases the formation of new nerve cells (by increasing Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)

  • could prevent Alzheimer's

  • increases focus and concentration

  • increases myelin formation in nerve tracts, which is very helpful in treating multiple sclerosis

Studies [1-10]

  1. Ryu, Sun; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Kim, Joo Youn; Kim, Seong Yun; Cho, Kyung-Ok (2017): Hericium erinaceus Extract Reduces Anxiety and Depressive Behaviors by Promoting Hippocampal Neurogenesis in the Adult Mouse Brain. In: Journal of medicinal food. DOI: 10.1089/jmf.2017.4006.

  2. Sheng, Xiaotong; Yan, Jingmin; Meng, Yue; Kang, Yuying; Han, Zhen; Tai, Guihua et al. (2017): Immunomodulatory effects of Hericium erinaceus derived polysaccharides are mediated by intestinal immunology. In: Food & function 8 (3), S. 1020–1027. DOI: 10.1039/c7fo00071e.

  3. Wang, Mingxing; Konishi, Tetsuya; Gao, Yang; Xu, Duoduo; Gao, Qipin (2015): Anti-Gastric Ulcer Activity of Polysaccharide Fraction Isolated from Mycelium Culture of Lion’s Mane Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Higher Basidiomycetes). In: International journal of medicinal mushrooms 17 (11), S. 1055–1060

  4. Yang, Chao; Zhao, Linlin; Yuan, Weitang; Wen, Jianguo (2017): Cordycepin induces apoptotic cell death and inhibits cell migration in renal cell carcinoma via regulation of microRNA-21 and PTEN phosphatase. In: Biomedical research (Tokyo, Japan) 38 (5), S. 313–320. DOI: 10.2220/biomedres.38.313.

  5. http://en.cnki.com.cn/Article_en/CJFDTOTAL-WIEC199902013.htm

  6. Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Shimada, Atsushi; Hosokawa, Satoshi; Mori, Hironobu; Sakamoto, Hideki; Ishiguro, Yukio et al. (1996): Erinacines E, F, and G, stimulators of nerve growth factor (NGF)-synthesis, from the mycelia of Hericium erinaceum. In: Tetrahedron Letters 37 (41), S. 7399–7402. DOI: 10.1016/0040-4039(96)01687-5.

  7. Mori, Koichiro; Inatomi, Satoshi; Ouchi, Kenzi; Azumi, Yoshihito; Tuchida, Takashi (2009): Improving effects of the mushroom Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceus) on mild cognitive impairment: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. In: Phytotherapy research : PTR 23 (3), S. 367–372. DOI: 10.1002/ptr.2634.

  8. Park, Young Shik; Lee, Hyun Soo; Won, Moo Ho; Lee, Jin Ha; Lee, Shin Young; Lee, Hyeon Yong (2002): Effect of an exo-polysaccharide from the culture broth of Hericium erinaceus on enhancement of growth and differentiation of rat adrenal nerve cells. In: Cytotechnology 39 (3), S. 155–162. DOI: 10.1023/A:1023963509393.

  9. Ryu, Sun; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Kim, Joo Youn; Kim, Seong Yun; Cho, Kyung-Ok (2017): Hericium erinaceus Extract Reduces Anxiety and Depressive Behaviors by Promoting Hippocampal Neurogenesis in the Adult Mouse Brain. In: Journal of Medicinal Food 21 (2), S. 174–180. DOI: 10.1089/jmf.2017.4006.

  10. Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; David, Rosie Pamela; Bakar, Robiah; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary (2012): Neuroregenerative potential of lion’s mane mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. (higher Basidiomycetes), in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury (review). In: International journal of medicinal mushrooms 14 (5), S. 427–446.

  11. Zhang, Junrong; An, Shengshu; Hu, Wenji; Teng, Meiyu; Wang, Xue; Qu, Yidi et al. (2016): The Neuroprotective Properties of Hericium erinaceus in Glutamate-Damaged Differentiated PC12 Cells and an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model. In: International journal of molecular sciences 17 (11). DOI: 10.3390/ijms17111810.


5. Shiitake / Chinese Champignon (Lentinula edodes)


Shiitake is the most popular edible mushroom in Asia and is increasingly being used here too. In traditional Chinese medicine, it is an important medicinal mushroom and is used particularly for tumoral and metabolic diseases, as it:

  • is very rich in ß-glucan, potentially effective against viruses and cancer cells

  • is antihypertensive

  • can lower blood fat and cholesterol

  • works against fatty liver

  • is supportive of weight loss (see lose weight quickly)

  • is used in Asia for: headaches, arteriosclerosis, fatty liver

  • increases response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer

Studies [1-7]

  1. Afrin, Sadia; Rakib, Md Abdur; Kim, Boh Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ok; Ha, Yeong Lae (2016): Eritadenine from Edible Mushrooms Inhibits Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Vitro. In: Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 64 (11), S. 2263–2268. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05869.

  2. Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yang, Xiaoming; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Ting; Wu, Shou-Fang et al. (2012): Recent progress of research on medicinal mushrooms, foods, and other herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine. In: Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 2 (2), S. 84–95.

  3. Sari, Miriam; Prange, Alexander; Lelley, Jan I.; Hambitzer, Reinhard (2017): Screening of beta-glucan contents in commercially cultivated and wild growing mushrooms. In: Food chemistry 216, S. 45–51. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.08.010.

  4. Shimada, Yasuhiko; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio (2002): Effects of dietary eritadenine on delta6-desaturase activity and fatty acid profiles of several lipids in rats fed different fats. In: Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry 66 (7), S. 1605–1609. DOI: 10.1271/bbb.66.1605.

  5. Sugiyama, K.; Akachi, T.; Yamakawa, A. (1995): Hypocholesterolemic action of eritadenine is mediated by a modification of hepatic phospholipid metabolism in rats. In: The Journal of nutrition 125 (8), S. 2134–2144.

  6. Yang, Hyun; Hwang, Inho; Kim, Sun; Hong, Eui-Ju; Jeung, Eui-Bae (2013): Lentinus edodes promotes fat removal in hypercholesterolemic mice. In: Experimental and therapeutic medicine 6 (6), S. 1409–1413. DOI: 10.3892/etm.2013.1333.

  7. Afrin, Sadia; Rakib, Md Abdur; Kim, Boh Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ok; Ha, Yeong Lae (2016): Eritadenine from Edible Mushrooms Inhibits Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Vitro. In: Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 64 (11), S. 2263–2268. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05869.

  8. Sugiyama, K.; Akachi, T.; Yamakawa, A. (1995): Hypocholesterolemic action of eritadenine is mediated by a modification of hepatic phospholipid metabolism in rats. In: The Journal of nutrition 125 (8), S. 2134–2144. DOI: 10.1093/jn/125.8.2134.


6. Rattle sponge / Maitake (Grifola frondosa)


The Maitake complements the Shiitake very well and has its main focus on the immune system and metabolism: The Maitake:

  • supports a healthy immune system

  • increases energy consumption and can be used when losing weight

  • has an anti-inflammatory effect

  • works against fatty liver (fatty liver is a major health problem, especially in western countries, where it has been shown to contribute to metabolic syndrome and obesity.)

  • is rich in the fiber ß-glucan which is said to have an antitumoral and antiviral effect by stimulating the immune system

  • lowers cholesterol and blood sugar levels

  • lowers side effects of chemotherapy in cancer

  • increases human chi (life force), which is why this mushroom is very popular in Chinese medicine

Studies [1-4]

  1. Chien, Rao-Chi; Yang, Yi-Chi; Lai, Eric Icheng; Mau, Jeng-Leun (2017): Anti-Inflammation and Lipogenic Inhibition of Taiwanofungus salmonea Mycelium and Grifola frondosa Fruiting Body. In: International journal of medicinal mushrooms 19 (7), S. 629–640. DOI: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2017021239.

  2. Engin, Atilla (2017): Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. In: Advances in experimental medicine and biology 960, S. 443–467. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-48382-5_19.

  3. He, Xirui; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jiacheng; Chang, Yu; Ning, Ning; Guo, Hao et al. (2017):

  4. Polysaccharides in Grifola frondosa mushroom and their health promoting properties: A review. In: International journal of biological macromolecules 101, S. 910–921. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2017.03.177.

  5. Masuda, Yuki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Akihiro; Naito, Kenta; Konishi, Morichika (2017): Antitumor activity of orally administered maitake alpha-glucan by stimulating antitumor immune response in murine tumor. In: PloS one 12 (3), e0173621. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0173621.


7. Silver Ear (tremella fuciformis)

In traditional Chinese medicine, the Tremella has been used against tuberculosis, colds and high blood pressure for thousands of years. The Silver Ear:

  • has strong antioxidant thanks to the polyphenols and fiber it contains

  • has an immune stimulating effect and helps to fight acute infections

  • protects nerve cells throughout the body

  • has a cholesterol-lowering effect, probably due to the increased formation of bile acids

  • lowers blood sugar

  • helps in the elimination of heavy metals

  • protects against radioactive pollution by binding parts of the radioactive substances and discharging them from the body

  • inhibits cancer cells from growing

  • protects the liver from hepatitis

  • supports the regeneration of skin and connective tissue and is becoming increasingly popular as an "anti-aging fungus".

Studies [1-12]

  1. Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yang, Xiaoming; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Ting; Wu, Shou-Fang et al. (2012): Recent progress of research on medicinal mushrooms, foods, and other herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine. In: Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 2 (2), S. 84–95.

  2. Li, Hua; Lee, Hee-Seok; Kim, Su-Hwan; Moon, BoKyung; Lee, Chan (2014): Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of methanol extracts of Tremella fuciformis and its major phenolic acids. In: Journal of food science 79 (4), C460-8. DOI: 10.1111/1750-3841.12393.

  3. Pan, Rong; Cao, Lixiang; Huang, Haiwei; Zhang, Renduo; Mo, Yu (2010): Biosorption of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn from aqueous solutions by the fruiting bodies of jelly fungi (Tremella fuciformis and Auricularia polytricha). In: Applied microbiology and biotechnology 88 (4), S. 997–1005. DOI: 10.1007/s00253-010-2821-y.

  4. Ryu, Sun; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Kim, Joo Youn; Kim, Seong Yun; Cho, Kyung-Ok (2017): Hericium erinaceus Extract Reduces Anxiety and Depressive Behaviors by Promoting Hippocampal Neurogenesis in the Adult Mouse Brain. In: Journal of medicinal food. DOI: 10.1089/jmf.2017.4006.

  5. Xu, Wenqing; Shen, Xiu; Yang, Fujun; Han, Ying; Li, Ruifeng; Xue, Dan; Jiang, Chengfeng (2012): Protective effect of polysaccharides isolated from Tremella fuciformis against radiation-induced damage in mice. In: Journal of radiation research 53 (3), S. 353–360.

  6. Lee, Jangho; Ha, Su Jeong; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yun Tai et al. (2016): Protective effect of Tremella fuciformis Berk extract on LPS-induced acute inflammation via inhibition of the NF-kappaB and MAPK pathways. In: Food & function 7 (7), S. 3263–3272. DOI: 10.1039/c6fo00540c.

  7. Gao, Q. P.; Jiang, R. Z.; Chen, H. Q.; Jensen, E.; Seljelid, R. (1996): Characterization and cytokine stimulating activities of heteroglycans from Tremella fuciformis. In: Planta medica 62 (4), S. 297–302. DOI: 10.1055/s-2006-957888.

  8. Cheng, Hsing-Hsien; Hou, Wen-Chi; Lu, Mei-Ling (2002): Interactions of lipid metabolism and intestinal physiology with Tremella fuciformis Berk edible mushroom in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet with or without Nebacitin. In: Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 50 (25), S. 7438–7443.

  9. Cho, Eun Jae; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Sang Woo; Oh, Jung Young; Baek, Yu Mi; Choi, Jang Won et al. (2007): Hypoglycemic effects of exopolysaccharides produced by mycelial cultures of two different mushrooms Tremella fuciformis and Phellinus baumii in ob/ob mice. In: Applied microbiology and biotechnology 75 (6), S. 1257–1265. DOI: 10.1007/s00253-007-0972-2.

  10. Lee, Jangho; Ha, Su Jeong; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yun Tai et al. (2016): Protective effect of Tremella fuciformis Berk extract on LPS-induced acute inflammation via inhibition of the NF-kappaB and MAPK pathways. In: Food & function 7 (7), S. 3263–3272. DOI: 10.1039/c6fo00540c.

  11. Li, Hua; Lee, Hee-Seok; Kim, Su-Hwan; Moon, BoKyung; Lee, Chan (2014): Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of methanol extracts of Tremella fuciformis and its major phenolic acids. In: Journal of food science 79 (4), C460-8. DOI: 10.1111/1750-3841.12393.

  12. Xu, Wenqing; Shen, Xiu; Yang, Fujun; Han, Ying; Li, Ruifeng; Xue, Dan; Jiang, Chengfeng (2012): Protective effect of polysaccharides isolated from Tremella fuciformis against radiation-induced damage in mice. In: Journal of radiation research 53 (3), S. 353–360.


8. Judas Ear / Chinese Morel (Auricularia polytricha)


The mushroom of the year 2017 is also known as "Chinese morel". It is this classic black slimy mushroom that can be found in the "Ten Delicacies" in Chinese restaurants. I like to eat it because I like its consistency and it allows me to regenerate much faster after exercise.

  • Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for thousands of years against arteriosclerosis

  • has a blood thinning effect

  • increases microcirculation (blood flow)

  • can lower cholesterol

  • forms melanin, the brown pigment that forms on your skin when you are exposed to the sun

  • has strong anti-inflammatory

  • promotes libido

  • has an antihypertensive effect and stimulates blood circulation

Studies [1-6]

  1. Acharya, Krishnendu; Samui, Krishnendu; Rai, Manjula; Dutta, Bani Brata; Acharya, Rupa (2004): Antioxidant and nitric oxide synthase activation properties of Auricularia auricula. In: Indian journal of experimental biology 42 (5), S. 538–540.

  2. Cai, Ming; Lin, Yang; Luo, Yin-long; Liang, Han-hua; Sun, Pei-long (2015): Extraction, Antimicrobial, and Antioxidant Activities of Crude Polysaccharides from the Wood Ear Medicinal Mushroom Auricularia auricula-judae (Higher Basidiomycetes). In: International journal of medicinal mushrooms 17 (6), S. 591–600.

  3. Jin, Yaxiang; Hu, Xinyu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Tianji (2016): Studies on the purification of polysaccharides separated from Tremella fuciformis and their neuroprotective effect. In: Molecular medicine reports 13 (5), S. 3985–3992. DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2016.5026.

  4. Reza, Ahsanur; Choi, Myung-Jin; Damte, Dereje; Jo, Woo-Sik; Lee, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joong-Su; Park, Seung-Chun (2011): Comparative Antitumor Activity of Different Solvent Fractions from an Auricularia auricula-judae Ethanol Extract in P388D1 and Sarcoma 180 Cells. In: Toxicological research 27 (2), S. 77–83. DOI: 10.5487/TR.2011.27.2.077.

  5. Sun, Shujing; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Chen, Wenxing; Zhang, Liaoyuan; Zhu, Hu (2016): Production of natural edible melanin by Auricularia auricula and its physicochemical properties. In: Food chemistry 196, S. 486–492. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.09.069.

  6. Yoon, Seon-Joo; Yu, Myeong-Ae; Pyun, Yu-Ryang; Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Chu, Djong-Chi; Juneja, Lekh Raj; Mourao, Paulo A. S. (2003): The nontoxic mushroom Auricularia auricula contains a polysaccharide with anticoagulant activity mediated by antithrombin. In: Thrombosis research 112 (3), S. 151–158. DOI: 10.1016/j.thromres.2003.10.022.


9. Turkey Tail (Coriolus versicolor)


The Turkey Tail mushroom is one of the most effective immunomodulators on the planet. In Japanese medicine, their extracts are approved as complementary medicine for some types of cancer.

  • The ingredients PSK and PSP have a clinically proven effect against various types of cancer (stomach cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, and lung cancer)

  • The Turkey Tail has a strong antiviral effect, especially with chronic infections such as EBV, CMV, varicella zoster

  • currently in Europe phase 3 studies against cancer

Studies [1-7]


  • 1. Choi, J. H., Y. B. Kim, H. Y. Lim, J. S. Park, H. C. Kim, Y. K. Cho, S. W. Han, M. W. Kim, and H. J. Joo. “5-Fluorouracil, Mitomycin-C, and Polysaccharide-K Adjuvant Chemoimmunotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: The Prognostic Significance of Frequent Perineural Invasion.” Hepatogastroenterology 54, no. 73 (Jan-Feb 2007): 290-7.

  • 2. Fritz, H., D. A. Kennedy, M. Ishii, D. Fergusson, R. Fernandes, K. Cooley, and D. Seely. “Polysaccharide K and Coriolus Versicolor Extracts for Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review.” Integr Cancer Ther 14, no. 3 (May 2015): 201-11. https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534735415572883.

  • 3. Ito, G., H. Tanaka, M. Ohira, M. Yoshii, K. Muguruma, N. Kubo, M. Yashiro, N. Yamada, K. Maeda, T. Sawada, and K. Hirakawa. “Correlation between Efficacy of Psk Postoperative Adjuvant Immunochemotherapy for Gastric Cancer and Expression of Mhc Class I.” Exp Ther Med 3, no. 6 (Jun 2012): 925-30. https://dx.doi.org/10.3892/etm.2012.537.

  • 4. Mir-Tutusaus, J. A., E. Parlade, M. Villagrasa, D. Barcelo, S. Rodriguez-Mozaz, M. Martinez-Alonso, N. Gaju, M. Sarra, and G. Caminal. “Long-Term Continuous Treatment of Non-Sterile Real Hospital Wastewater by Trametes Versicolor.” J Biol Eng 13 (2019): 47. https://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13036-019-0179-y.

  • 5. Sakai, T., Y. Yamashita, T. Maekawa, K. Mikami, S. Hoshino, and T. Shirakusa. “Immunochemotherapy with Psk and Fluoropyrimidines Improves Long-Term Prognosis for Curatively Resected Colorectal Cancer.” Cancer Biother Radiopharm 23, no. 4 (Aug 2008): 461-7. https://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cbr.2008.0484.

  • 6. Sakamoto, J., S. Morita, K. Oba, T. Matsui, M. Kobayashi, H. Nakazato, and Y. Ohashi. “Efficacy of Adjuvant Immunochemotherapy with Polysaccharide K for Patients with Curatively Resected Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Centrally Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.” Cancer Immunol Immunother 55, no. 4 (Apr 2006): 404-11. https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-005-0054-1.

  • 7. Yoshitani, S., and S. Takashima. “Efficacy of Postoperative Uft (Tegafur/Uracil) Plus Psk Therapies in Elderly Patients with Resected Colorectal Cancer.” Cancer Biother Radiopharm 24, no. 1 (Feb 2009): 35-40. https://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cbr.2008.0547.